Child Support Collections Logo

Child Support Laws

the state child support collection links below to learn about your state's child support collection laws and rules.

Learn how child support is determined, at what point does the obligation to pay support end, the guidelines for maintaining medical insurance and even how custody and visitation is determined. You'll also learn if your state allows garnishment action for unpaid child support.

Child Support Laws by State

Alabama
Colorado
Georgia
Indiana
Maryland
Missouri
New Hampshire
Ohio
South Carolina
Virginia
Wyoming
Arkansas
Connecticut
Hawaii
Kansas
Massachusetts
Montana
New Jersey
Oklahoma
South Dakota
Vermont
Guam
Alaska
Delaware
Iowa
Kentucky
Michigan
North Carolina
New MexicoOregon
Tennessee
Washington
Puerto Rico
Arizona
D.C.
Idaho
Louisiana
Minnesota
North Dakota
Nevada
Pennsylvania
Texas
Wisconsin
Virgin Islands
California
Florida
Illinois
Maine
Mississippi
Nebraska
New York
Rhode Island
Utah
West Virginia


Federal child support collections law

This law falls under Public Law 104-134 Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996 Executive Order 13019 Supporting Families: Collecting Delinquent Child Support Obligations

The Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996 was enacted into law on April 26, 1996, to authorize the Secretary of the Treasury to collect past-due child support by the administrative offset of Federal payments. Executive Order 13019 of September 1996, requires the Secretary of the Treasury to promptly develop and implement procedures necessary for the collection of past-due child support debts by administrative offset.

It is estimated that there are 10-15 million families in our country who are not getting the child support they deserve and that more than $30 billion in child support goes uncollected every year! Although the government has introduced tougher penalties for those who don't pay their child support, these penalties are useless if you can't find the absent parent!

Federal Child Support Administrative Offsets

Administrative offset simple means that the government can take either some or all of a person's federal payments such as tax returns to satisfy delinquent child support payments.

What they can Take

Federal Laws

Code of
Federal Regulations

How much can they take!

Federal tax refund

42 U.S.C. 664
31 CFR 285.345

Child-support debts 26 U.S.C. 6402(c)
CFR 303.72
HHS procedures

100 %

Federal salary

5 U.S.C. 551415
U.S.C. 1673(b)(2)31
U.S.C. 370131
U.S.C. 3716(h)

5 CFR 550.110131
CFR 285.7
State law & regulations
HHS procedures

50%-65%

Federal non-tax non-salary non-benefit

31 U.S.C. 370131
U.S.C. 3716(h) 31

CFR 285.1
State law & regulations
HHS procedures
Exec. Order 13019

100%, except as otherwise provided by law

Federal and State child support collection laws are based on the premise that children have a right to the care and support of their parents. It is the responsibility of parents to provide this support: the Government can help parents who live apart from their children meet their responsibilities. However, the government's current child support system has failed to find and collect from, (and prosecute) effectively those who want to avoid supporting their children.

State Enforcement Agencies

Index of State Laws - Further Research